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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:30am EDT
transforming the global economy." here's the cover of the book. professor auerswald, what role does fairplay and economic development? >> guest: well, that's a great question and maybe i'll talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development and our conversation presence? so when we talk about our reality and share our ideas in the marketplace, we are competing with other ideas. we know three things about marketplace ideas. short-term sells better than long-term. fear sells better than hope. negative sells better than positive that is to say exaggerated flows better than moderated. to receive disproportionate number of short-term narratives of negative, exaggerated stories essentially. so short-term on the negative come exaggerated. that's what's talked about any ideas. we are creatures who grew up in the savanna or environments where we were always subject to threat. so we're looking at that thing is going to hurt us, but we are no longer in those environments. we are in a complex economy, that really relies on organizations to provide basic necessities. so we
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:45pm EST
making little ironic comments, ha-ha-ha, you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving par down that he just saved or created four turkeys. my friends here, they know that i do have a contrarian streak. i don't really do group think. i'm a guy who visited the gulf after the bp spill and wrote that the environmental damage was being wildly overstated. i was right. i had data. but arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal wasn't just considered contrarian. it was considered delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. it was the combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communications, brain dead media coverage, really the unfortunate timing of a jobs bill that passed when the u.s. was hemorrhaging 800,000 jobs a among. the financial earthquake hit but the economic tsunami hadn't hit the shore. fortunately in 2010 i was a thousand miles away and was pretty oblivious to the prevailing stimulus narrative. but i did become aware because i write a
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 3:00pm EST
important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without first going through valerie jarrett. so what is this power she has? the only explanation i could come up with after all these interviews i did, was that she has given the first lady and the president the impression she has their back, she's protecting them from a hostile world, if you will, a world in which people can come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to his liking. so, for instance, when, as an example, when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical -- i'm sorry -- health insurance for abortions and contraceptions, bill daly, the then chief of staff, brought archbishop dolan for new york, the catholic archbishop to speak to the president. when valerie -- because she was obviously opposed to this mandate as a catholic. when valerie jarrett heard about it she went ballistic because bill bailey, the chief of staff, hadn't asked her permission to allow dolan to see the president. so, suddenly her power and control
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 11:00pm EDT
-- it stifles motivation and part of the socialist philosophy of command and control of the economy. do you have a car? yeah. i won't ask you the model. what if the manufacturer you bought the car from through the dealership discovered a serious defelgt if all the cars of that model and didn't tell you. would that bother you, anti-regulatory person? well, depends on the defect. back stiffening. let's say it's a sticking throttle, defect, one that overthrows your brakes and throws you into a brick wall or another vehicle. do you think that manufacture should notify you? yeah, sure, only fair play. all right. what if the manufacturer doesn't want to? do you think the law should require it? when you get down to where people work, live, play, sleep, raise their children, the abstractions, as george lill pointed out once, disappear or diminish. george will was in the home in northwest washington, a syndicated columnist, a conservative, and he's writing out the column for that week, and he's a crash. he rushes out, and on the residential street are two cars crash into each other and a dea
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:45pm EDT
class are the ones falling out of stability and prosperity not because the economy changed for the jobs went away but because they are their own feelings and if you think that this kind of a fringe thing or he's a scholar, so that book was a best seller just like all of his books because the right by his books and we don't, so i'm not talking a lot in the one in particular but liberals need to buy more books. it's not a fringe sentiment because i started hearing echoes on the primary trail. you had rick santorum come out and say the problem was dependency, when the family falls apart the economy falls apart and rather than the other way around, that it's harder to have stable families when the economy is falling apart. you had new gingrich call barack obama the food stamp president and those of us that heard a dog whistle or racial coding weaver absolutely right but new gingrich was also right when he said i'm not talking about black people, will get all the white people, the percentage of white people is also skyrocketing again. we have independent country. paul ryan was talking about
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
people. we saw what happened in the 1920s when folks came in, of course, and helped keep your economy alive when it was booming, and then when the economy busted in 1929, mr. hoover deported them all. we saw what happened in the war, all immigrants came in, kept fields and factories and mines alive, and then in 1954, mr. eisenhower, another great military leader, allowedded one of the same people from that expedition against poncho to begin to round up immigrants. in 1954, the same year a young man, your age, a young man whose family fled poe land because of the holocaust, went to canada, came into new york as someone seeking freedom and exile, someone who understood the beauty of the american dream. in 1959, reportedly, that's when tom horn got his citizenship. our attorney general, the same here hundreds of thousands of mexicans and mexican-americans and their children were deported in operations. it's not about immigration, jeff, she told me. do you understand that? it's not about immigration. it is something bigger with these drones now that come along the border. it is something
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
are going to send a load of books at that point in time to africa. we found out our economy was paying $95 a truckload to pour them into landfill. we had too many for one shipment and let's do another to another and let's do another and it took on a life of its own. we just pass -- and the people want to grasp that i say look at a football field. side to side, and zones inside zones that is about 300 tractor-trailers and we shipped out 15 of those tractor-trailers a year and then basically a library in a box, 25,000 looks at a time and send to iraq and afghanistan and peace corps volunteers. some of the rea blue book said we have and we get books from schools and libraries and we believe we have the largest volunteer base project in the world which means we can ship very inexpensively. we ship for about $4000 per container. somebody some of the other groups and their wonderful organizations that are doing this for. they started $16,000 because they are using aid to individuals. individuals. we are a bulk shipper. would bring them in, sort them out and put them in the a container
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 4:45pm EST
compensation survey. they reported that the highest median compensation of any sector of the u.s. economy that year was health care. it was not the banking industry. it wasn't the oil industry. it's health care. i'm also mindful of during the financial crisis charles prince, head of the seven the music stops things would get complicated, but as long as the music is playing, we have to get up and dance, and we are still dancing. i sometimes feel that about health care. living trajectories, and where are we headed? so the question remains, is health care reform bill to last? what do you think? lets talk about the cost and coverage provision under health care reform. who will be covered under the patient protection and affordable care act? or will it cost? the good news is, up to 16 million low-income people may be covered under medicaid, the joint federal-state program. maybe because there are a number of state governors you are not inclines to expand medicaid. at think it is more for political reasons. they also have some very serious budget situations. i suspect there will be a lot of pre
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:30pm EDT
you describe syria's economy as far as its structure? >> guest: syria's economy went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state hood economy to a mixed economy that involved centralized aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> host: when did this change occur from centralized to mixed? >> guest: most of the countries, the late developing countries, after the post colonial development, they had a period where they actually had to involve the masses in order to gain support and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons, began to create problems for the regimes and power and when external support and pressure for some of the regimes and for some of the directions that were available at the time in terms of moving towards the market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes or the global house begin to move from a state centered economy to a more market oriented economy, and the international financial institutions like the imf and world bank, pl
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 6:00pm EST
the economy would be doing by to be better by 32 and franklin roosevelt was a weak candidate to be running against income. people like walter wittman 1932 as the campaign was getting under way. the candidates to oppose roosevelt to the democratic nomination if anyone of those other candidates had won the democratic nomination the democrats might very well have run a candidate to the right of herbert hoover in the election of 1932. if that happened to the progressive republicans were ready to run an independent third-party choosing mayor bloomberg. there's always a possibility of the candidate getting in for the race, and because the economy collapsed, the socialist party and a lot of other radical party stop that they were going to do terrific in 1932, the public would turn to them and increase their numbers. the socialists were projecting a would get twice the votes they ever had before. the communist party said they were going to get a million votes in that election. so, at least in the beginning of 1930 to the end of it looked very different. but of course we know that franklin
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
tavern ballads and folk songs, from learned treatises of political economy to popular novels and plays, americans on every side of the war question proved eager to talk about love of country. a war that might easily have been dismissed as a terrific waste of time and money, if not deplored as a disasterous display of hubris. instead, sparked what one newspaper famously described as an era of good feelings. as madison's claim on those who loved their country and felt her wrongs made clear, emotion became central to the war's appraisal. everything was to be contemplated but the lens of patriotic love. throughout the war of 1812 popular conclusions about the meaning of events were liable to be based more on the emotional language used to describe them than on rational appraisal what had occurred. while europeans continued to declare their love of country grew out of child like deeggs veries to sovereign kings and american sons of liberty fought revolutions from monarchs from what they called brotherly love, americans of 1812 emphasized their patriotism grew from another variety of familia
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 6:00pm EDT
control of the young american economy. in fields, drawing room, and counting houses across the atlantic, the words new york" were equivalent for opportunity. yet, until this fall morning, new york was no more assured of becoming the empire state than was virginia, pennsylvania, or even ohio, south carolina, or illinois. nor was the nation assured of becoming the global empyre it remains. in 1825, the united states were still plural and few, not a singular nation state, but sovereign states with a constitutionally limited federal government. as late as 1855 walt whitman proclaimed, quote, "the united states with vaining full of poetical stuff," and lincoln declared they changed the grammar and perception in the 1860s. in 1825, the sea to shining sea continental nation, a patriotic song, still a dream. the land was vast, and control of it was limited. the louisiana territory was purchased two decades earlier, but remained unorganized. mexico's north stretch from the sabine river on the gulf of mexico to the 42nd parallel on the pacific ocean what is now texas, arizona, new mexico
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 9:30am EDT
can put into the economy. the statistic often cited about 70% of cartels might be a little bit high, but quite a lot of organized-crime is not from the heroin but cannabis and we could have american farmers growing this and on the industrial side and north dakota's agricultural commissioner is begging to put this plant back to work for america's factories quoting energy. i went to an energy sustainability festival for my previous book where i was giving a talk and the of the speaker was the usda expert on biofuels and she told me about all sorts of biofuels i have not heard of, filters and toxics in the soil and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank yo
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
have you in argentina. he doesn't want to just bring the argentine economy to its knees. he wants to bring united bank of switzerland, citibank, jpmorgan. a bank of america, he said all the money they have too. now he can go after the congo but not enough. you can go after argentina and you can go after detroit. it's not nice. you can go after citibank and united bank of switzerland and our president is really angry. so he was secretary of state clinton, takes a very unusual nearly unprecedented action of going before the courts, the federal courts here in washington to say, this man's actions, his vulture fund action and that includes romney, their
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
ultimately the subtitle is boom and bust in the old west. so i am looking at the way the economy affects our lives, the way the economy gets into our bodies. it is a book that i wrote because my body arrived in the desert under particular circumstances in the winter of 1997 when i was broke, broken and on drugs. i was in mexico city and lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from the new york publishers to write a book, a dream come true and in mexico city by november of 1997 i crossed the deadline and didn't have a word written and i was broke and i called the only friend i could count on at that point because my life style led me to destroy a lot of personal relationships. i called a performance artist in costa rica who lived in the united states for many years and met for the solidarity network, art and politics in the 1980s and i said [speaking spanish] and she happened to be in the village of joshua tree, california at that time. there are circumstances that led her from the tropics, how did she wind up in the desert? everybody has a story i
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
about effects on the economy and bringing manufacturing back i thought before we got to the macro, we can talk about the macro and micro effect in this kind of technology. >> all right. so when you have an idea and you printed out when you hold in your hand, you tweet about it and we think this is great. the good news is that i actually went back in 1977 i probably should have been even more fit to go to 1984. in 1985, the first laser printer from apple as well. we forget how mind blowing that was. publishing used to be something that you needed. now you can put it on your desktop. you can point and click and it has become high-quality professional staff. that is super exciting, but only a few of them. those printers spoke a language called postscript. it was the same language spoken by the biggest printers in the world. you can upload it to a printer and you really could publish it. that was kind of exciting. and then we did the same thing with the web. you can distribute as well. now we are doing the same thing with physical goods. rather than printing it, they added an additive tec
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 9:00pm EDT
on the economy to get reelect the, but because he was willing to risk reelection for the sake of doing something permanent to expand the state and to realize more of liberalisms goals. he is, to that extent, he is doing what the markists call heightening the contradictions. he is, in a certain way, begging for the crisis to come, accelerating the crisis, and that's because, i think, and i could be wrong about this, it may be he finds a way to compromise in the second term, if there is one, but i think the game he's playing is more ideological than that, and i think that he would not reject the chance to put it conservatively to have a real fiscal crisis in which there's no stark alternatives. either taxes must go up enormously in order to fund the present promises and some of the future promises made in the welfare state, or we must fundamentally trim the welfare state, and i mean, that would be an opportunity, as i say in the book to sweetennize the american economy and to move from a federal government that spends sw somewhere between, you know, 19% or 20% of gdp every year to
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 4:00pm EDT
industrial economy is larger. if we should take the innovation model, we can take social forces, you know, the cultural revolution of the web and apply this to the industries of the world. you know, the internet -- it would be just the beginning we could really see what the revolution could do. when you think about the sake of the subtitle of my book is the new industrial revolution. going to sort of race that is the third industrial revolution. let me explain how this works. the first industrial industrial revolution as all of you know -- here's a quick lesson. how many of you think the first industrial revolution came in the 1700s? nobody. how many think it came in the 1800s? about half. how many people think it came in the 1900s? okay most of the thing to happened in the 1800s. first the answer is nobody has a precise definition, most people start in 1776 around the time the american revolution with the spinning jenny. with spinning wheels all the way back to fairytale time, for the spinning jenny vicious multiple wheels and often had a tribe now -- a tribal rather returns multiple whe
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 9:00am EST
big to fail scenario of 08 is when hank paulson said if this doesn't pass there will be no economy on monday. to you think with the romney or obama as president of another such moment occurred that the tea party types would listen to people like that and still send the economy down the drain? >> well, there is a moment that i memorialize in my book during the debt ceiling standoff that i think is real, you know, illustrative. the thinking of the more conservative flank. and it was the house leaders, you know, i'm answering your question in a general way because i can speak specifically in the future. but there were concerned. they believe that ceiling needed to be raised. they did believe that risking the full faith and credit of the netting states was a very dangerous proposition. they believe that a default would be a terrible thing for this country, and so because they could see that a lot of there fellow members did not believe that to be the case they brought in this treasury, this former treasury undersecretary named j. paul who served in the george herbert walker bush of min
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
well. .. >> are insurance companies do well and we are relatively protected from the national economy. we are a tourism-based community. in fact, our downtown buildings almost all full. we are very optimistic to the brink of our downtown and new testament presents for people who want to visit your. >> i would say that we have a vibrant business community. but it is virtually all independent. modulator really does value the independent nation. we are the only part of the country that doesn't have a mcdonald's. and it is a testimony to the citizens. they banded together and made it clear that this is not the kind of business that we wanted. and that was the outcome. so there is a real sense of independence, and i think that is what you see here. a value of among the people who live here to shop locally, and you see that today. >> welcome to montpelier, vermont. with the help of our comcast partners. for the next hour, we will travel the area in and around this capital city. coming up, visits to programs that this is a community that values writing and reading. >> later to the vermont co
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:00pm EDT
job and started doing it full time. >> host: tell me about the khan economy. let's start with the audacious school which i just found very big and audacious, the business model that you based it on? >> guest: maybe i will go the other way around because when i was starting all of this in i came from a for-profit reality. i have friends who are venture capitalists. they said we could form the senate could be this double bottom-line business and there was a lot of temptation there. there's nothing wrong with that but there's this there is this feeling and i was getting all of this emotional reward from the thank you letters of people were sending me in the sense that i took a simple thing for my cousin and hundreds of thousands if not millions of students are using around the world. i'd like to step to be around in 100 years or 500 years and i don't want this collection of software and content and disorganization, i don't want it wanted to skew from this mission of being able to reach people. what i looked at other organizations in the universe that are able to do that and last cent
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:00am EDT
have a harder time adapting to the economy and women are adapting more easily. there are periods when men have adapted easily but at this period, education and credentials. economy is fast-changing and who knows what it will throw at us? women are getting those killed and credentials that a faster rate than men are and seem to be more nimble and that filters into our society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and notions of fatherhood and what men can or cannot do in families or how young people have sex and make decisions and you start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: we have heard there's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 1:00am EDT
i'm looking at the way the economy affects our lives, the way the economy gets into our very bodies. it's a book that i write because i, my body, arrivedded in the desert under very particular circumstances in the winter of 1997 when i was broke, broken, and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publisher to write a book. it was, you know, a dream come true, and in mexico city by 1997, i had crossed the deadline, and i didn't have a word written. , i was broke. i called the only friend that i could count on at that point because my lifestyle led me to destroy personal relationships. i called one friend, a performance artist from coast ca rica who livedded in the united states, met through the solidarity network, politics in the 1980s, and i said, -- ] speaking spanish], and there was a set of serks ling her, from the central tropics, central america, how did she end up in the desert? everyone has a story of the desert and how they got there. she said we'll take care of you over give yo
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
the economy affects our lives, the way the economy gets into our very bodies. it said that i wrote because my body arrived in the desert under circumstances in the winter of 1997, when i was broken and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from my new york publisher to write a book. it was a dream come true and in mexico city in 1997 i had crossed the deadline and i didn't have a word written. and i was broke. i called the only friend that i could count on at that point because my lifestyle has destroyed a lot of my personal relationships. we had met through the solidarity network back in the 1980s and i said,. [speaking spanish] and she happened to be living in the area of joshua tree california at that time. she was from the tropics of central america. everybody has a story in the desert of how they got there. she said we will take care of you. shortly thereafter i arrived in the desert and one of the first things that i saw when i rented my little shack out in the stands next to a sign that said d
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)